21 May 2006

The Wine Century Club

Dr. Vino recently wrote about tasting his 100th grape and joining the Wine Century Club. Membership is free, and you get a certificate honoring your accomplishment. It works on the honor system, so it's mostly for fun. I went to a wine festival this weekend--more on that later--and got to try some unusual grapes. Late last night I decided to go through my notes and figure out how many grapes I've tried.

100.

As in, exactly 100 after yesterday's encounter with some oddballs. I just finished going through the list and auditing it, removing any duplicates (Spanish grapes often have multiple names, and some Italian grapes have different names in Spain and France). But it looks like it's solid. And it may be slightly more--I stopped digging through my notes when I hit Welschriesling and made it to 100. (Of course, I think you could probably spend a month in Italy and hit 200 grapes easy, but most would be unknown outside of their various regions.)

The vast majority of these are from posts on this blog, though sometimes you might have to follow the link to the winemaker to get the grape varieties. A few others are from old handwritten notes before I started the blog, and some include the Port and Sherry grapes, of which I've had a lot but don't blog about often.

My list includes eleven that aren't on the Century Club spreadsheet, mostly French-American hybrids and some obscure Spanish grapes. But I've researched each one, and they appear to be unique varieties, just not terribly popular. Here it is:

  1. Albarino
  2. Aligote
  3. Arinto
  4. Arneis
  5. Baco Noir
  6. Barbera
  7. Bianca Fernanda
  8. Blaufrankisch
  9. Bobal
  10. Bonarda
  11. Brachetto
  12. Cabernet Franc
  13. Cabernet Sauvignon
  14. Canaiolo
  15. Carignane
  16. Carmenere
  17. Catawba
  18. Chambourcin
  19. Chancellor
  20. Chardonel
  21. Chardonnay
  22. Chenin Blanc
  23. Colombard
  24. Colorino
  25. Concord
  26. Cortese
  27. Corvina
  28. Dolcetto
  29. Dornfelder
  30. Gamay
  31. Garganega
  32. Gewurtztraminer
  33. Godello
  34. Grenache
  35. Gruner Veltliner
  36. Kadarka
  37. Kerner
  38. Loureiro
  39. Macabeo
  40. Malbec
  41. Malvasia
  42. Malvasia Nera
  43. Marechal Foch
  44. Marsanne
  45. Melon de Bourgogne
  46. Merlot
  47. Meunier
  48. Molinara
  49. Montepulciano
  50. Mourvedre
  51. Muller Thurgau
  52. Muscadelle
  53. Muscadine
  54. Muscat Blanc
  55. Muscat of Alexandria
  56. Muscat Ottonel
  57. Nebbiolo
  58. Negroamaro
  59. Niagara
  60. Norton
  61. Palomino
  62. Parellada
  63. Pedro Ximenez
  64. Petit Verdot
  65. Petite Sirah
  66. Pinot Blanc
  67. Pinot Gris
  68. Pinot Noir
  69. Pinotage
  70. Prosecco
  71. Refosco
  72. Riesling
  73. Rondinella
  74. Roussanne
  75. Ruby Cabernet
  76. Sangiovese
  77. Sauvignon blanc
  78. Semillon
  79. Seyval Blanc
  80. Steuben
  81. Syrah
  82. Tannat
  83. Tempranillo
  84. Tinta Barroca
  85. Tinto Cao
  86. Tocai Fruilano
  87. Torrontes
  88. Touriga Franca
  89. Touriga Nacional
  90. Traminette
  91. Trajadura
  92. Trebbiano
  93. Trepat
  94. Verdejo
  95. Verdelho
  96. Vidal
  97. Viognier
  98. Welschriesling
  99. Xarel-lo
  100. Zinfandel

3 comments:

Grace said...

You have entirely too much time on your hands.

How's your liver?;)

Fredric Koeppel said...

No fragolino.

Dr. Vino said...

Cool! Congrats! Welcome to the club!